The New York Times: COURT COSTS ENTRAP NONWHITE, POOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS

Dequan’s experience is hardly an isolated one. The ways that fines and fees can entrap low-income people in the adult courts have received enormous attention in the past year or two. But the systematic imposition of costs on juvenile offenders, with equally pernicious effects on the poorest of them, is far less known.

 Dequan Jackson, 16, at his home in Jacksonville, Fla. After Dequan was charged with battery at age 13, he and his mother were unable to pay $200 in court and public defender fees, which extended his probation by more than a year. CreditCharlotte Kesl for The New York Times

Dequan Jackson, 16, at his home in Jacksonville, Fla. After Dequan was charged with battery at age 13, he and his mother were unable to pay $200 in court and public defender fees, which extended his probation by more than a year. CreditCharlotte Kesl for The New York Times